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Mar 27th, 2014
 
Microfluidic device with artificial arteries measures drugs’ influence on blood clotting
 
A new microfluidic method for evaluating drugs commonly used for preventing heart attacks has found that while aspirin can prevent dangerous blood clots in some at-risk patients, it may not be effective in all patients with narrowed arteries.
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Image 1: Microfluidic Chip
Image 1: Microfluidic Chip

The study, which involved 14 human subjects, used a device that simulated blood flowing through narrowed coronary arteries to assess effects of anti-clotting drugs.

Image 1: The researchers used a device that simulated blood flowing through narrowed coronary arteries to assess effects of anti-clotting drugs. Credit: Rob Felt.

The study is the first to examine how aspirin and another heart attack prevention drug respond to a variety of mechanical blood flow forces in healthy and diseased arteries. Patients’ blood was tested in a patent-pending microfluidic device with narrow passageways to simulate the coronary arteries. The data are consistent with clinical findings showing that physiology has a major influence on the effectiveness of drugs used for heart attack prevention.

The researchers believe that a benchtop diagnostic device like the one used in this study could save lives by preventing heart attacks and help lower healthcare costs by giving physicians better guidance on how drugs may affect individual patients.

To read the complete article, please click on the following link:
http://www.news.gatech.edu/2014/03/24/microfluidic-device-artificial-arteries-measures-drugs%E2%80%99-influence-blood-clotting

 

 
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