Neuromorphic computing system reaches 100 Million neurons

An article written by Sally Ward-Foxton for EETIMES India – Intel has scaled up its neuromorphic computing system by integrating 768 of its Loihi chips into a 5 rack-unit system called Pohoiki Springs.

Intel has scaled up its neuromorphic computing system by integrating 768 of its Loihi chips into a 5 rack-unit system called Pohoiki Springs. This cloud-based system will be made available to Intel’s Neuromorphic Research Community (INRC) to enable research and development of larger and more complex neuromorphic algorithms. Pohoiki Springs contains the equivalent of 100 million neurons, about the same number as in the brain of a small mammal such as a mole rat or a hamster.

Intel’s Pohoiki Springs system uses 768 Loihi chips, takes up 5 rack units and uses 300W (Image: Intel)

Neuromorphic chip

Intel debuted its Loihi neuromorphic chip for research applications in 2017. It mimics the architecture of the brain, using electrical pulses known as spikes, whose timing modulates the strength of the connections between neurons. The modulation of these strengths is analogous to how weights affect the impact of parameters in an artificial neural network.

Loihi’s architecture uses extreme parallelism, many-to-many communication and asynchronous signals to mimic the brain’s structure (there are no multiply-accumulate units). The aim is to provide performance improvements for special brain-inspired algorithms at dramatically reduced power levels.

“We’re computing neural networks in a completely different manner, in a way that’s more directly inspired from how neurons actually process information,” said Mike Davies, director of Intel’s Neuromorphic Computing Lab. “That’s through what’s called spikes — neurons activate and they send messages in an asynchronous event-driven manner across all of the neurons in the chip, processing information in a very different way.”… Full article

Source: https://www.eetindia.co.in

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